Romney Got Off Easy – Bush Was Accused of the "Niggerization of the American People"

August 16, 2012 at 10:08 pm (9/11, C-Span, CNN, Cornel West, George W. Bush, Kira Davis, Mitt Romney, MSNBC, Niggerization, Niggerization of America, PBS, President Bush, President Obama, Racism, Toure)

There is, understandably, plenty of outrage today after hearing MSNBC host Touré accuse Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney of what he called the “niggerization” of President Obama.

MSNBC’s Touré has now declared that Mitt Romney is engaged in the “niggerization” of Barack Obama. What exactly did Romney do to earn this reprehensible slur? He said that Obama, whose campaign has already called Romney a racist, a sexist, a felon, and a murderer, should “take [his] campaign of division and anger and hate back to Chicago.”

Why, precisely, did this comment constitute “niggerization,” and what did that vile word mean? Why was Touré invoking one of the most egregious slurs ever to enter the language? Well, let Touré explain:

“That really bothered me. You notice he said anger twice. He’s really trying to use racial coding and access some really deep stereotypes about the angry black man. This is part of the playbook against Obama, the ‘otherization,’ he’s not like us.

“I know it’s a heavy thing, I don’t say it lightly, but this is ‘niggerization.’ You are not one of us, you are like the scary black man who we’ve been trained to fear.”

Appropriately, the level of disgust for such an outrageous slander has been great.  But there is one person who may believe Romney got off relatively easy for being accused of the “niggerization” of one man.

George W. Bush wasn’t similarly slandered for his actions towards any one person rather, he was accused of the “niggerization” of the entire “American people”.  And it wasn’t just that he was smeared with such a disgusting term, but that he was accused of using the events of 9/11 to achieve that goal.

So was it some hack blogger on the left who used such terminology?  Nay.

Bush was accused of promoting the “niggerization of the American people” by frequent guest of the Bill Maher Show, host on CNN, C-Span and PBS, and esteemed Professor at the University of Princeton, Cornel West.

In a piece for the Atlantic, West wrote:

Since the ugly events of 9/11, we have witnessed the attempt of the Bush administration—with elites in support and populists complacent—to promote the niggerization of the American people. Like the myopic white greed, fear, and hatred that fueled the niggerization of black people, right-wing greed, fear, and hatred have made all of us feel intimidated, fearful, and helpless in the face of the terrorist attacks. And, as in the 19th century, we’ve almost lost our democracy.

Additionally, West can be seen in this video comparing the backdrop of the Attica Rebellion to attitudes fostered by the ruling government party after 9/11.

West:  The Attica Rebellion was a counter move in that direction – I call it the “niggerization” of a people.  Not just black people because America been “niggerized” since 9/11.

Is it any wonder that Touré has referred to Professor West as a “genius”?

In the end, there’s nothing new to see here.  Just as it was acceptable for George Bush to be accused by liberals of “niggerizing” America, so too will it be acceptable for liberals to state that Mitt Romney is “niggerizing” Obama.

But let there be no doubt which side of the aisle the true racists sit.

Update:  Kira Davis provides a great video response to Toure.  The YouTube description:

Toure says Romney’s tactics are the “niggerization” of Obama. I take HUGE issue with that term and accusation, as someone with intimate knowledge of racism.

Permalink Leave a Comment

We Now Pause For This Moving Ballad to Five Guys Burgers

August 16, 2012 at 4:03 pm (Bacon Burger, Ballad, Burgers, Damn, Daym Drops, Five Guys Burgers, Love Song, Oh My Dayun, This is How Bacon Is Supposed To Be)

I’ve personally never witnessed such emotion, such love, such unbridled passion involving … a bacon burger. And a side of fries.  Well, since the last time I had bacon anyway.

But I certainly can’t express my love for rising cholesterol quite the way this man can.

It.  Is.  Epic.

Via the Daily Caller:

Upon first listen of Daym Drops’ “Oh My Dayum,” it might seem like just another overly auto-tuned R&B love song with trite lyrics.

But once Drops lays down that chorus with the passionate riff on Five Guys’ crispy french fries, it’s clear that the singer has intimate knowledge on his subject, and has experienced these sensations and feelings before:

“Oh my goodness, oh my damn this is how bacon is supposed to be/ the fries they blend so perfectly/ the cheese up in here is going ham/ Damn! Damn! Damn!”

There are moments in “Oh My Dayum” that might make you think, This is what R&B is supposed to sound like. And you know what? You wouldn’t be wrong.

Here’s the Ballad of Bacon Burgers.  You’re welcome…

Permalink Leave a Comment

DCCC’s Dishonest Medi-Scare Campaign Won’t Fool New Yorkers

August 16, 2012 at 3:25 pm (Bill Owens, Bob Turner, DCCC, Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, Democrats, Louise Slaughter, Medi-Scare, Medicare, New York, Paul Tonko, President Obama, Republican Party, Steve Israel, Tim Bishop)

Today the New York State Republican Party responded to DCCC Chairman Steve Israel’s new television ad campaign:

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, led by New York’s own Steve Israel, is out with their first campaign ad of the 2012 season, in which they falsely accuse a Republican Congressman of voting to “end Medicare.”

Democrats tried these “Medi-scare” tactics last year, and they failed:

In New York’s 9th Congressional District, Republican Bob Turner won in a three-to-one Democratic district not held by a Republican since 1923 and in a swing Nevada district, the Republican won by twenty-two points.

Neither Barack Obama nor Congressional Democrats have a plan to save Medicare from bankruptcy.

In fact, only one bill in history signed by an American President actually removed funds from Medicare.

It was Obamacare, written by Democrats, signed into law by Barack Obama and passed with the votes of Steve Israel, Dan Maffei, Bill Owens, Paul Tonko, Louise Slaughter, Nita Lowey and Tim Bishop.

Team Obama’s doubling down on a failed attack line speaks volumes about their lack of confidence in their own record.

And Americans know why Democrats don’t want to discuss that:

Obama promised hope and change, but the legacy of his domestic legislative and regulatory agenda is high unemployment, the worst economic recovery in
70 years, four years of trillion-dollar deficits and the most federal government spending since World War II.

Come January, Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan will put America back on the path to fiscal sanity and economic prosperity.

Permalink Leave a Comment

Video: White House Press Secretary Reduced to Explaining That Obama Has Eaten Dogs

August 16, 2012 at 2:01 pm (Barack Obama, Bro, Devo, Dogs, Don't Roof Rack Me, Eats Dogs, Indonesia, Jake Tapper, Jay Carney, Joe Biden, Mitt Romney, Paul Ryan, President Obama, Tasty Dogs)

ABC’s White House correspondent Jake Tapper has reported that the love affair between the mainstream press and the President may be over – not for a lack of effort on the media’s part.

President Obama hasn’t formally taken questions from the White House press corps in more than two months, while on the campaign trail in Iowa yesterday he made time for reporters from People Magazine and Entertainment Tonight.

His last news conference was at the G20 in June, when he answered six questions from three reporters on the European debt crisis, the conflict in Syria, and the notion of politics stopping at the water’s edge.

The White House press corps has not formally been given the opportunity to ask questions of the president on U.S. soil since his appearance in the Briefing Room on June 8 (when he said “the private sector is doing fine.“)

His last formal White House news conference was on March 6.

So why has the President avoided the very people who ushered him into the White House in 2008?  Perhaps he is worried that a press conference would involve questions on the sputtering economy, or how he has raided Medicare, or the rising troop death toll in Afghanistan?  And with no control, the President instead propogates his rock star image by entertaining the tabloid journalists from People or Entertainment tonight.

Or perhaps it’s just depression. 

It’s depressing to know that Mitt Romney has chosen an economic and budgetary wizard in Paul Ryan, and that this pick is lifting the Republicans in key swing states.

Or maybe it’s depressing to know that you might have to defend the man who serves as the counterpunch to Ryan – Joe Biden, a man who doesn’t know what state or century he is in.

Or maybe it’s this:  Your messaging is so far off course right now that Press Secretary Jay Carney had to resort to discussing the notion that the President has indeed eaten dogs…

Where is Devo on this topic?  I wonder if Seamus would rather be roof racked, bro, or sauteed.

The full comment is here:

Jay Carney on President Obama cracking a joke about dogs on top of cars: “I think he made one allusion in three different speeches that was a joke. Just like the Romney campaign campaign and others have joked about the fact that in the president’s memoir he talked about, as a boy, eating dog meat in Indonesia because that is something that is done there. I think a little levity is a little different from the kind of ridiculous charges that are being made here.

Permalink Leave a Comment

NY AG Files Brief In Support of Racially Discriminatory College Admissions Policies

August 16, 2012 at 7:46 am (Abigail Fisher, Affirmative Action, Attorney General, Brief, Eric Schneiderman, New York, Race, Supreme Court, University of Texas)

Some call it a backing of affirmative action policies, while others call it a full-throated endorsement of discrimination.  Regardless, 13 attorneys general, led by New York’s own Eric Schneiderman, have filed a brief urging the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold racial preferences in college admissions.

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, on behalf of 14 states, is urging the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold racial preferences in college admissions.

The court is scheduled to hear arguments Oct. 10 in a lawsuit by Abigail Fisher, a white student who was not admitted to the University of Texas in 2008. Fisher is challenging the university’s admissions policy as a violation of her civil and constitutional rights.

The court’s ruling will be its first on affirmative action in higher education since 2003.

“The states all share a strong interest in preserving the flexibility of their varied institutions to pursue a range of strategies to achieve the educational benefits of diversity in higher education,” Schneiderman and state Solicitor General Barbara Underwood said in a brief filed late Monday. They noted that public schools like the State University of New York, ranging from community colleges to research universities, enroll about 72 percent of post-secondary students nationally and play an especially important role for students with modest means.

Other states joining the brief were Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Montana, New Mexico, North Carolina, Vermont, Washington and West Virginia, plus the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The Justice Department has argued that a diverse college population is not only in the best interest of the university, but also the government’s.  But the tactics in which a college attains that diversity is what is in question, as the University of Texas had shifted from accepting students based on class rank, to finding other ways to diversify the student population.  In other words, some students who may have been accepted based on academic performance would now compete with others who may have been chosen based on better personal essays or on their extracurricular merits – and with race in mind.

The brief (provided below) is very similar to one filed in 2010 with the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, also supporting the University of Texas’ use of racial preferences in their undergraduate admissions process. The brief had been filed by then solicitor general and current Justice, Elena Kagan, and stems from the same battle begun in the 2003 ruling that narrowly permitted race-conscious policies in public higher education.

Such blatant support for the exploitation of race in education was panned by the National Review’s Roger Clegg, when he described the brief as “a full-throated endorsement of such discrimination.”

The Supreme Court’s review of this affirmative action case may have political ramifications as well.  The review is expected to occur in October—placing it squarely in the minds of voters just weeks prior to the presidential election.

SCOTUS Brief Fisher v University of Texas

Permalink Leave a Comment