Middle East Scholar: Obama Considered ‘Weak, Feckless’, Bush ‘Feared’

October 2, 2012 at 11:03 am (Arab Spring, Benjamin Netanyahu, Brookings Institute, Foreign Policy, George W. Bush, Israel, Middle East, President Obama, Shadi Hamid)

Yea but … Obama killed Osama.  Hadn’t you heard?

Via Bloomberg: 

… all we have from Obama is passivity, which is a recurring theme in the administration’s approach to the Middle East. So is “aggressive hedging,” a term used by the Brookings Institution’s Shadi Hamid to describe Obama’s strange reluctance to clearly choose sides in the uprisings of the Arab Spring.

“There’s a widespread perception in the region that Obama is a weak, somewhat feckless president,” Hamid, who runs the Brookings Doha Center, told me. “Bush may have been hated, but he was also feared, and what we’ve learned in the Middle East is that fear, sometimes at least, can be a good thing. Obama’s aggressive hedging has alienated both sides of the Arab divide. Autocrats, particularly in the Gulf, think Obama naively supports Arab revolutionaries, while Arab protesters and revolutionaries seem to think the opposite.”

Leaders across the Middle East don’t take Obama’s threats seriously. Neither Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu nor the Arab leaders of the Gulf countries believe he’ll act militarily against Iran’s nuclear program in his second term.

Not to fear, we don’t take it very seriously here either when the President pretends to be a tough foreign policy advocate.

When it comes to foreign policy, it looks like it was actually George Bush who had the big stick.

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Romney: "Attack on American Individuals and Embassies is Outrageous, It’s Disgusting"

September 12, 2012 at 12:21 pm (America, Arab Spring, Arab Winter, Christopher Stevens, Egypt, Leadership, Libya, Mitt Romney, Terrorism)

Mitt Romney delivered the following remarks on yesterday’s attacks on American diplomatic missions in Egypt and Libya:

“Americans woke up this morning with tragic news and felt heavy hearts as they considered that individuals who have served in our diplomatic corps were brutally murdered across the world. This attack on American individuals and embassies is outrageous, it’s disgusting. It breaks the hearts of all of us who think of these people who have served, during their lives, the cause of freedom, and justice and honor. We mourn their loss and join together in prayer that the spirit of the Almighty might comfort the families of those who have been so brutally slain.

“Four diplomats lost their life, including the U.S. Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens, in the attack on our embassy at Benghazi, Libya. And, of course, with these words, I extend my condolences to the grieving loved ones, who have left behind, as a result of these who have lost their lives in the service of our nation, and I know that the people across America are grateful for their service and we mourn their sacrifice.

“America will not tolerate attacks against our citizens and against our embassies. We will defend also our constitutional rights of speech and assembly and religion. We have confidence in our cause in America. We respect our Constitution. We stand for the principles our Constitution protects. We encourage other nations to understand and respect the principles of our Constitution because we recognize that these principles are the ultimate source of freedom for individuals around the world.

“I also believe the Administration was wrong to stand by a statement sympathizing with those who had breached our embassy in Egypt instead of condemning their actions. It’s never too early for the United States Government to condemn attacks on Americans, and to defend our values. The White House distanced itself last night from the statement, saying it wasn’t ‘cleared by Washington.’ That reflects the mixed signals they’re sending to the world.

“The attacks in Libya and Egypt underscore that the world remains a dangerous place and that American leadership is still sorely needed. In the face of this violence, America cannot shrink from the responsibility to lead. American leadership is necessary to ensure that events in the region don’t spin out of control. We cannot hesitate to use our influence in the region to support those who share our values and our interests. Over the last several years, we have stood witness to an Arab Spring that presents an opportunity for a more peaceful and prosperous region, but also poses the potential for peril, if the forces of extremism and violence are allowed to control the course of events.

“We must strive to ensure that the Arab Spring does not become an Arab Winter.”

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Egypt Proposing Law to Allow Men to Have Sex With Their Dead Wives?

April 27, 2012 at 7:26 am (Arab Spring, Egypt, Farewell Intercourse Law, Husbands, Marriage, Necrophilia, Wives, Women, Zamzami Abdul Bari)

It may seem a little extreme at first glance, but the new Egyptian government would like you to know they aren’t a band of barbarians stuck in the seventh century.  They have their limitations.  As demonstrated by the fact that the men will only be able to have sex with their dead wives for up to six hours after they’ve died.

Now that’s taking the moral high ground.

It’s called the ‘farewell intercourse law’ and we’re not even making that up.  It also includes provisions to lower the marriage age down to 14 and prohibiting a woman’s right to education and employment.

But hey, it’s the Arab Spring!

Via the Daily Mail:

Egyptian husbands will soon be legally allowed to have sex with their dead wives — for up to six hours after their death.
The controversial new law is part of a raft of measures being introduced by the Islamist-dominated parliament.
It will also see the minimum age of marriage lowered to 14 and the ridding of women’s rights of getting education and employment.
Egypt’s National Council for Women is campaigning against the changes, saying that ‘marginalising and undermining the status of women would negatively affect the country’s human development’.
Dr Mervat al-Talawi, head of the NCW, wrote to the Egyptian People’s Assembly Speaker Dr Saad al-Katatni addressing her concerns.
Egyptian journalist Amro Abdul Samea reported in the al-Ahram newspaper that Talawi complained about the legislations which are being introduced under ‘alleged religious interpretations’.
The subject of a husband having sex with his dead wife arose in May 2011 when Moroccan cleric Zamzami Abdul Bari said marriage remains valid even after death.
He also said that women have the right to have sex with her dead husband, alarabiya.net reported.

Then there’s this from Mark Steyn:

In Arab Spring, a young man’s fancy turns to … necrophilia? 

Gotta hand it to the Muslim Brotherhood. Hard to come up with a more apt image of the Arab Spring than an aroused Islamist rogering a corpse.

On behalf of the civilized world, we’d just like to say the following…  Ewwww.

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