Father of Slain SEAL: White House ‘Had a Moral Duty to Send Support, They Chose Not To’

October 27, 2012 at 11:41 am (Benghazi, Charles Woods, Chris Stevens, CIA, Hero, Heroes, Navy SEAL, Obama Administration, President Obama, Tyrone Woods, White House)

Morality isn’t a strong point of this administration, as we have come to learn over the last couple of months concerning the massacre in Benghazi.

Last night on Hannity the father of slain Navy SEAL Tyrone Woods, spoke about the moral bankruptcy of the White House in their response to the attacks, and the subsequent lies and cover up.

Here is a brief excerpt (transcript and video below):

“For seven hours the cowards in the White House were watching something they knew that was going to potentially kill those 30 people and potentially kill my son and they refused to do that – even though they had a moral duty to send support, they chose not to.”

TRANSCRIPT (Rough):

HANNITY: moments ago i spoke with the father of this american hero tyrone woods to get reaction to these developments. an incredible interview. here is what he had to say.

HANNITY: we have learned so much in the aftermath of this attack. and you know we learned that the ambassador first requested security. it was denied. we learned that while they were under attack that they requested security and none was forthcoming and we learnd that they were watching this in the state department, charleen lamb said they were watching in in real time so everybody knew what was going on.

CHARLES WOODS: right, exactly. when i went back to washington, d.c. when the bodies were flown in i knew that something was fishy. it just — it was just obvious that something was wrong with this picture and in my mind i questioned, you know, this was obviously a long drawn out battle. why there was no immediate air support sent in that would have saved the lives of not just the other 30 people but also the life of my son who truly was an american hero? now, it has come out that pleas for help were made not just by the other individuals but by my son and these pleas were turned down by the white house. now, as you know i’m a retired attorney and i know that these actions legally do not constitute murder but in my mind the people in the white house all of them who have authority to send in reenforcements to prevent what they knew was going to be the death of my son are guilty of murdering my son. there is new information that came out this morning that my son on a couple of different occasions requested permission to go to the aide of those 30 people being attacked and on at least two of the first occasion he was told stay where you are are at, let them die, don’t go and it does not surprise me that my son disobeyed orders in order to save american lives. that is the type of american hero he was.

HANNITY: so after he was told to stand down as i understand t there were numerous other are pleas for help and your son actually as i understand it rescued many people and got them out of the consulate. is that true?

WOODS: you know, one of the real touching e-mails i got was — i won’t mention a name but i received an e-mail from someone who said your son’s sacrifice saved my life and he saved more than one life and that is the type of man he was. that is the type of leadership the military needs.

HANNITY: so if he would have obeyed that order to stand down rather than help the ambassador’s team that person is telling you they wouldn’t be alive today.

WOODS: that is correct.

HANNITY: and then —

WOODS: and a many other people as well.

HANNITY: your son first got involved, was told to stand down after they heard shots at a approximately 9:40 p.m. now, as i understand it, it wasn’t until about 4:00 a.m. the next day that your son after he had rescued other people was still fighting in this attack and it was then that he took on mortar fire?

WOODS: that is my understanding. for seven hours the cowards in the white house were watching something they knew that was going to potentially kill those 30 people and potentially kill my son and they refused to do that even though they had a moral duty to send support they chose not to. this is not the way the seals operate. the seals are an honorable unit and ty was honorable by disoh boying the powers in the white house that told him not to rescue those lives.

HANNITY: your son was told to stand down. a navy seal, risks h his military career and his life for 7 full hours and rescues all these people. multiple requests throughout the entire period go, it is be hing watched in real time and nobody sends any help. i can’t fathom this. and then we are told the president goes out there for two weeks and couldn’t admit this is a tort attack. why do you think he tried to blame it on the video or denied it was a terror attack?

WOODS: unfortunately, sean, we have a generation of liars who have no moral background. hopefully my son’s sacrifice and his moral courage and his moral strength will encourage our next generation to be completely different. that we will change our direction. that we will raise up a new generation of true american here are rows such as my son — heros such as my son who have moral courage and who are are not liars like too many people in authority are nowadays.

HANNITY: i know you met the president and you met hillary clinton. when they had this service.

WOODS: that is, correct. at andrew’s air force base when the bodies were flown in.

HANNITY: you said the president couldn’t look you in the eye and it was like shaking hands with a dead fish.

WOODS: that’s exactly right.

HANNITY: and so you felt he couldn’t look you in the eye and that basically he felt no empathy and you said the same thing pretty much about hillary clinton?

WOODS: right. what happened was he came through there kind of after everyone else had been in the room circulating and he came over and shook my hand, you know, i wanted to do more than just shake his hand so i kind of put my arm around his shoulder to have just a little bit of physical warmth, not a major hug but just a small one and he kind of — it wasn’t in a powerful voice it was more of just a whiney little voice i’m sorry. i could tell my his voice he wasn’t even sorry. it would be like a little kid that is told by the teacher to go apologize to johnny out on the play ground and when looked at me his face was pointed towards me but he couldn’t look me in the eye. he was shooing over my shoulder and like i say, i thought he political — literally like shaking hands with a dead fish. i did not believe him at all as far as his being sore arery and now we understand why. was he one of those cowards that was in the white house watching my son being murdered on tv and refusing to do anything? that is a question that he will probably not have the courage to answer publicly but i would like to personally know that answer and one of these days the whole i’m sure that we will have that answer.

HANNITY: it is the hardest thing to lose a child and learning about the heroics of your son are beyond inspiring. he put everything on the line, you know, if we want to use a biblical quote no greater love hath a man than to day down his life for someone else. your son lay down his life for others.

WOODS: thank you very much, sean. i appreciate the work you are doing.

HANNITY: i appreciate your time. thank you for being with us

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Feel Good Story: Firefighters Revive Korean War Vet at 9/11 Ceremony

September 22, 2012 at 11:00 am (9/11, Congress Park, Eugene Corsale, Firefighters, Hero, Heroes, Korean War, New York, Saratoga Springs, September 11th, Veteran)

A Korean War Veteran is crediting the swift actions of local firefighters in Saratoga Springs, NY with saving his life after he collapsed while serving as Master of Ceremonies at a 9/11 Remembrance Day event.

Eugene “Gene” Corsale remembers reciting the Pledge of Allegiance before collapsing at the podium in front of his grandson.  His heart had stopped.

“I was ready to introduce the police, and that was the end of it,” he said. “I woke up in the emergency room.”

Despite the experience, Corsale insists that he was lucky.

Via the Times Union:

Looking back, the 2008 New York State Veteran of the Year says his heart picked a fine time to stop ticking. Attending the 9/11 service to recall those lost in the terrorist attacks of 11 years ago were members of the Saratoga Springs Fire Department, who had brought a truck with medical equipment.

When Corsale collapsed, the firefighters broke ranks and sprang into action. When they reached Corsale with a heart monitor, they found he had no pulse, Chief Robert Williams said Friday. The firefighters administered manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation, electric shocks to Corsale’s chest with a heart defibrillator and medications, which restarted his heart, Williams said.

“We were able to get him to where he had a strong pulse and he was beginning to respond to his name,” said Williams, who was at the scene. “He had the right people and the right equipment close by,” Williams said.

At the scene and credited for quick thinking and transporting Corsale to the hospital were Capt. Robert Murphy, lieutenants John Stewart and Michael Woodcock, and firefighters Michael O’Reilly, Jason Yourdon, Brian Kissinger, Jack Longo, Nicholas Colucci, Jeffrey Alonzo, Jordan Daviero and Matthew Daviero.

Please read the rest, including a brief history of Corsale’s service to his country in the Navy, and his service to fellow veterans after the war.

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The Luckiest – How 9/11 Saved My Life

September 11, 2012 at 8:46 am (9/11, Abortion, Heroes, September 11th, The Luckiest)

For many, Sept. 11, 2001, was a day that will forever be seared into the minds of those who were witness. On that day, the nation was awoken by a harsh reality that there are people who want nothing more than to destroy our freedom, our way of life. That morning, America was brutally scarred for life. It was a day that 19 hijackers, four airplanes, two towers, and one deranged ideology brought the threat of terrorism to the forefront in our country.

For when we think of 9/11, many things understandably come to mind. We think of death – the sheer number of Americans killed that day was staggering. We think of terrorists. We think of tragedy, of loss, of hopelessness. We remember watching over 3,000 of our friends and family dying that day, we remember the screams of the heroes on Flight 93, the screams of women and men, mothers and fathers, wives and husbands, who desperately made an attempt to take back a plane scheduled for a suicide mission which surely would have killed many more.

I always have one other thought however – I think of life, and how mine began that day.

In a powerful speech a couple of years ago, Sarah Palin framed the upcoming elections using an issue sometimes relegated to the backburner during turbulent economic times – abortion. According to her, the elections boiled down to candidates who favor a ‘culture of life’, and those who promote a ‘culture of death’.

There are several arguments made by those supporting legalized abortion, the health of mother and child, and cases of rape and incest being what resonates with most. Polling suggests that a very small fraction of abortions are performed for these extreme reasons. Problems arise mostly in those who view abortion as a matter of social and economic convenience. Herein lies a fundamental flaw with the pro-choice argument; a struggle to acknowledge the fact that a human life begins at conception, and that same life is not an inconvenience but rather, a necessity.

This has been a concept that I, myself, once struggled with. Exactly eleven years ago that personal struggle ended. For Americans, 9/11 has a singular tragic meaning related to the events we endured as a nation. For one man, it also served as an awakening; a transformation from a ‘culture of death’ mentality, to a conservative embracement of life.

The year prior to 9/11, when word was received of the pending birth of my first child, my reaction, much like the autumn breeze, was a bit chilly. I went so far as to heavily promote the idea of an abortion to my girlfriend. I had failed to recognize the value of life, and though my girlfriend fortunately had, she was unable to instill this in me.

Recognizing that this disagreement was going nowhere, my next move was one that would make any self-respecting coward proud – I ran. Frightened. From responsibility, from acceptance of my actions, from hard work, from any semblance of religious or family values, and the sanctity of life – I ran.

The summer of ‘01 arrived, along with the birth of my daughter, an event that I did not witness. The burden of knowing that I was a father, but was not acting as such, weighed heavily on my mind. Yet still, I took no action.

On September 11th, I drove home from work, having been released early due to the attack and subsequent security concerns. While driving home on the highway, mind numb in trying to process the day’s events, I passed under a bridge. Looking up, there was a man who looked more than a bit ragged, as if he had just awakened to hear the news of the attacks, and simply walked out of his house. Wearing disheveled clothes and a weary face, he somehow found himself standing on this bridge, arms raised skyward, holding the American flag.

Nearly four hours later, needing to clear my head, I decided to get back in my car and take a drive. My route brought me to that same highway, with that same bridge. Four hours later, the same man was still standing there, holding the flag up as high as he possibly could.

I broke down.

Here was a man who had reacted to the carnage witnessed earlier in the day by standing on a bridge and simply raising a flag for hours. It seemed he had no idea what to do, while simultaneously knowing that he had to do something. There were parallels to be drawn with my own situation. Now – finally – I had to do something.

Shortly afterward, I brought my daughter home for the first time. I sat alone with her in a recliner in my apartment, when she began to cry. Her father was truly petrified, as nothing was putting this baby at ease. Thinking back to the man on the bridge once more, I knew that I had to do something.

Just then, a frightened man with a wretched voice began to sing. The song was The Luckiest, by Ben Folds, and it meant the world to this little girl. If the song stopped for even an instant, she would begin to cry again. She needed me to sing that song for her in that moment. She needed me to embrace her, but nowhere near as much as her father needed the same. The ‘culture of life’ had found us both. And on that day, I had become – The Luckiest.

Abortion should not be wielded as a weapon of convenience, something I was guilty of doing. And life does indeed begin at conception, not solely for the child, but possibly, as in this case, for the mother and father as well.

Embracing the ‘culture of life’ allows one to understand what it feels like to actually live. To know what it feels like to have a morning begin with a child’s sticky kisses. To realize that the incessant racket of a child’s rattle can be the sweetest sound. To experience that moment of clarity where working overtime on that crucial project no longer makes sense, but watching your child chewing on her favorite crayons does.

With that, we remember the fallen that perished on this day. We remember the servicemen and women who continue to fight for the freedoms that we took for granted 11 years ago. We remember because we must never forget.

And now, I have the opportunity to reflect back on this day together with my eleven-year old daughter and realize that I am indeed – The Luckiest.

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Treasury Department Ignoring President’s Order to Fly Flags at Half-Staff to Honor Astronaut Neil Armstrong?

August 31, 2012 at 1:51 pm (Astronaut, D.C., Half-Staff, Hero, Heroes, Moon, Neil Armstrong, President Obama, Treasury Department, Washington)

The Treasury building in downtown Washington D.C. typically heeds the order to fly flags at half-staff to honor those who have died.  The President recently issued an order to have flags flown at half-staff to honor national treasure and first man to walk on the moon, Neil Armstrong.

Via Troop 903 (please read their writeup on the career of Neil Armstrong):

Flags across the nation are flying at half staff today in memory of astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first human to walk on the moon.

Armstrong died last Saturday at age 82. President Obama issued a proclamation Monday ordering U.S. flags to be flown at half-staff at all public buildings and facilities until sunset today, “as a mark of respect for the memory of Neil Armstrong” on the day of his interment.

The Treasury Department however, may not have received that notice.

That photo is courtesy of Jeff Quinton.  He explains in further detail at the Quinton Report:

This picture was taken around 1 p.m. ET on Friday, August 31, 2012.

This flag is at the rear of the Treasury Building in downtown Washington, DC. This picture is looking across 15th St. from F St.

This flag has always been half-staffed when other half-staffing orders were issued by the President, but not today.

Is it plausible that this is simple human error?  How would those responsible for the caretaking of the flag not have missed such an order?

Somebody has some explaining to do.

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Flags to Fly at Half-Staff For Lance Cpl. Gregory T. Buckley of Oceanside

August 15, 2012 at 3:46 pm (Afghanistan, Governor Cuomo, Gregory Buckley, Gregory T. Buckley, Hawaii, Helmond Province, Hero, Heroes, New York)

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo has directed that flags on state government buildings be flown at half-staff on Thursday, Aug. 16, in honor of a New York Marine who died in Helmond Province, Afghanistan, on August 10.

Lance Cpl. Gregory T. Buckley of Oceanside died while supporting combat operations.  He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, of the 3rd Marine Division, a part of the III Marine Expeditionary Force based in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii.

“I join with all New Yorkers in mourning the death of this brave Marine,” Governor Cuomo said.  “We will remember his service with pride and we extend our regrets of his loss to his friends, and fellow Marines.”

Governor Cuomo has directed that the flags on all State buildings be lowered to half-staff in honor of and in tribute to our state’s service members and those stationed in New York who are killed in action or die in a combat zone.

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Flags Flying at Half-Staff For Major Thomas Kennedy

August 14, 2012 at 12:00 pm (Afghanistan, Governor Cuomo, Hero, Heroes, Kennedy's Angels, New York, Sarkowi, Thomas E. Kennedy, Thomas Kennedy, West Point)

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo has directed that flags on state government buildings be flown at half-staff on Tuesday, August 14, in honor of a New York Soldier who died in Sarkowi, Afghanistan on August 8.

Maj. Thomas E. Kennedy, of West Point, died when an insurgent detonated a suicide vest. He was assigned to the Headquarters Company of the 4th Infantry Division’s 4th Brigade Combat Team based at Fort Carson, Colorado.

“Along will all New Yorkers I mourn the loss of this outstanding officer,”  Governor Cuomo said. “We will remember his honorable service to our nation and we are grateful for his dedication to duty.”

Governor Cuomo has directed that the flags on all state buildings be lowered to half-staff in honor of and in tribute to our state’s service members and those stationed in New York who are killed in action or die in a combat zone.

Links to a donation page for his beautiful kids can be found here…

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Donations Sought For Soldier, Husband, Father of Two Killed in Afghanistan

August 12, 2012 at 5:39 pm (#War, Afghanistan, Hero, Heroes, Kennedy's Angels, Killed In Action, Purple Heart, Taliban, Thomas Kennedy, Tommy Kennedy, West Point)

Thomas Kennedy was recently killed in action serving in Afghanistan.  He was a 35-year-old West Point grad who leaves behind a wife and two kids.

Via Journal News:

The news came mid-week that another suicide bombing in Afghanistan had stolen the lives of coalition troops in Afghanistan. It was soon discovered that New City native Maj. Thomas “TK” Kennedy was one of three Americans killed. His death came amid a week in which three other attacks were perpetrated upon coalition troops by those wearing Afghan military uniforms.

The losses underscore the peril faced by coalition troops, even as most international troops are set to depart in 2014, some 10 years after a U.S.-led invasion targeting Taliban rule and al-Qaida. According to the Associated Press, 30 coalition service members have been killed by those in Afghan uniform — either in disguise or among those who have been trained by coalition forces. It is a marked increase in such violence. Add to those losses the toll from ongoing attacks, like the one that killed Kennedy and his cohorts, by insurgents.

It is a reminder that every day, every hour, our military men and women continue to face grave risk, even as the war occupies less and less space in the national conversation. Their deaths are a deep loss to our nation, our community, and, most of all, the service members’ families. Maj. Kennedy leaves a wife, Kami, twins who turn 2 next month, his father, mother and brothers.

The 35-year-old West Point graduate was just three weeks into his first Afghanistan assignment, although he had completed tours in Iraq. He had earned dozens of medals and service medals — posthumously, a Bronze Star Medal and Purple Heart.

The family is requesting donations in Tommy’s name to help support his two beautiful angels.

Please consider visiting the Kennedy’s Angels web page… 

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Video: Heroes of the Aurora Theater Shooting

August 6, 2012 at 8:21 pm (Aurora, Colorado, Colorado Shooting, Hero, Heroes, Jon Blunk, Shooting Aurora Colorado, Theater Shooting)

The Denver Post has created a web page devoted to the heroes of the Aurora shooting.  Not simply a memorial for those who died as a result of the tragedy, but also including stories of people who put their own lives in danger to help others.  Many people from all walks of life became heroes that horrifying day.

What would I do?

When the lights go down in a movie theater, you are alone, even in the crowd.

Please be quiet. Silence your cellphone.

The room smells of popcorn butter, and your shoes stick to the floor. But the surroundings drift away as the images onscreen spool into your imagination and the sound effects vibrate into your rib cage. The accelerating story takes you along. That’s the point, isn’t it? To escape?

From practically the opening scene of “The Dark Knight Rises,” pretend guns fire and actors shriek, a classic slam-bang opener.

But then, during a quiet scene, the sound of gunshots — suddenly, confusingly — comes alive again in theater 9 at the Century Aurora 16. Bullets rip into the air. Innocents scream. The gunman shouts. The wounded wail out. The bloodshed is real.

What would I do?

Read the rest here…

Watch the video below…

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Flags Flying at Half-Staff For Two Fort Drum Soldiers Killed in Afghanistan

August 3, 2012 at 12:00 pm (Afghanistan, Bobby Estle, California, Flags, Governor Cuomo, Half-Staff, Hero, Heroes, Jose Belmontes, New York, Ohio)

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo has directed that flags on state government buildings be flown at half-staff on Friday, August 3, 2012 in honor of two Fort Drum soldiers who died in Wardak Province, Afghanistan on July 28.
Private 1st Class Jose O Belmontes from La Verne, Calif., and Sgt. 1st Class Bobby L. Estle, of Lebanon, Ohio died of injuries sustained from enemy small arms fire.  Both soldiers were assigned to the 630th Engineer Company of the 7th Engineer Battalion of the 10th Mountain’s 10th Sustainment Brigade.
“I join with all New Yorkers in mourning the loss of Private 1st Class Belmontes and Sgt. 1st Class Estle and send my deepest sympathies to their family, friends, and fellow soldiers,” Governor Cuomo said. “We will honor the service of these Fort Drum soldiers and we will be forever grateful for their dedication to our nation.”
Governor Cuomo has directed that the flags on all state buildings be lowered to half-staff in honor of and in tribute to our state’s service members and those stationed in New York who are killed in action or die in a combat zone.

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Flags Flying at Half-Staff For Pvt. 1st Class Theodore M. Glende

August 2, 2012 at 1:38 pm (Afghanistan, Governor Choking, Hero, Heroes, Italy, New York, Rochester, Theodore Glende)

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo has directed that flags on state government buildings be flown at half-staff on Thursday, August 2, 2012 in honor of a Rochester soldier who died in Afghanistan on July 27.

Pvt. 1st Class Theodore M. Glende died in Logar province, Afghanistan, when enemy forces attacked his unit with small-arms fire. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 503rd Infantry Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team, Vicenza, Italy.

“I join with all New Yorkers in mourning the loss of Private Glende, and I send my deepest sympathies to his family, friends, and fellow soldiers,” Governor Cuomo said. “We will honor the service of this young soldier and we will be forever grateful for his dedication to our nation.”

Governor Cuomo has directed that the flags on all state buildings be lowered to half-staff in honor of and in tribute to our state’s service and those stationed in New York who are killed in action or die in a combat zone.

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