Michelle Obama: We’re in the Midst of a Huge Recovery

October 15, 2012 at 2:50 pm (2012 Election, Economy, First Lady, huge Recovery, Jobs, Michelle Obama, Recovery, Unemployment)

If recovery means placing more people on food stamps than at any other time in our history, or seeing record numbers of people dropping completely out of the work force, then yes, we are in the midst of a huge recovery.

Via CNS News:

First Lady Michelle Obama said in a radio interview on Friday that the United States is in the “midst of a huge recovery” because of what “this president has done.”

Pablo Sato, co-host of Pablo & Free on WPGC 95.5, a Washington, D.C.-area hip-hop radio station, asked the first lady:  “Mrs. Obama, you know what, in your words, tell us what you think the state of the union is in right now?”

Mrs. Obama said, “I mean, we are seeing right now that we are in the midst of a huge recovery. Right?  Because of what this president has done.”

Median family income – significantly lower.

Gas prices – significantly higher.

National debt- $6 trillion greater.

Real unemployment – nearly doubled.

Food stamp spending – also nearly doubled.

Welcome to the huge recovery, America.

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About That Recovery – 20% of America’s Working Age Men Unemployed

March 29, 2012 at 7:00 am (Economy, Jobs, President Obama, Recovery, Underemployment, Unemployment)

The media really wants you to believe a recovery is taking place – reality is painting a different picture.

Remember, the significant reason for the unemployment rate dropping or steadying is because people have abandoned any hope of finding a job, and have quit looking.  It’s not because of job creation.

And now, read the report from the Daily Mail:

It makes for sobering reading.
In recent months the job market looked to be on the rise, offering hope that the economy might finally be getting back on track.
But data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that nearly 20 per cent of America’s core workforce are out of a job. 
After five years of struggles, it is a sobering reminder of how far the country still has to go.
Two in 10 or 17 per cent of men aged 25 to 54 – traditionally the backbone of the workforce – are unemployed.
Just five years ago 88 per cent of prime-age men were holding down steady jobs. Going back to the 1940s through 70s more than 90 per cent were in employment. 
More shocking still is the fact the number of 25 to 54-year-old men with a job (45.9 million) is actually lower than during the height of the recession, which ran from December 2007 to June of 2009. 

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